Noah Pozner Recalled as Jewish Boy With Big Heart

Newtown Victim's Mom Recounts Short Life Filled With Love

No Words: A grieving woman carries flowers at the funeral for Noah Pozner, who was laid to rest at B’nai Israel Cemetery in Connecticut.
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No Words: A grieving woman carries flowers at the funeral for Noah Pozner, who was laid to rest at B’nai Israel Cemetery in Connecticut.

By Forward Staff

Published December 17, 2012.

(page 3 of 4)

Miniature caskets marked the first wave of funerals as Noah Pozner and Jack Pinto, both 6 years old, were laid to rest on Monday afternoon. Noah was the youngest victim of rampage and his twin sister, Arielle, escaped unhurt.

Under chilly, leaden skies, police and bomb-sniffing dogs conducted a precautionary search of the street lined with white balloons outside the Fairfield, Connecticut, funeral home where Noah’s brief life was remembered.

“Everything he did conveyed action and energy through love. He was the light of our family, a little soul devoid of spite and meanness,” wrote his parents, Lenny and Veronique Pozner, and four siblings.

At Jack’s funeral in Newtown, about a half dozen children wearing a wrestling’s club gold medals took off the awards and gave them to their teammate’s parents. A New York Giants fan, Jack was wearing a red-and-white jersey with receiver Victor Cruz’s number 80 as he lay in an open white casket at the service. During Sunday’s game, Cruz wore shoes with “R.I.P. Jack Pinto” written on the side.

“Jack was an incredibly loving and vivacious young boy, appreciated by all who knew him for his lively and giving spirit and steely determination,” his parents, Dean and Tricia Pinto, and brother said in his obituary in the Newtown Bee.

Active in sports from football to skiing, he was remembered “for the immeasurable joy he brought to all who had the pleasure of knowing him, a joy whose wide reach belied his six short years.”

Their funerals came a day after President Barack Obama visited Newtown to comfort the families, promising action to stop future tragedies. Obama’s remarks were heralded on Monday morning by relatives of teacher Victoria Soto, 27, who was killed as she tried to protect her first-grade students.

“He really made us feel like she really was a hero and that everyone should know it,” her younger brother, Carlos Soto, told CBS “This Morning.”



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