Where's the Justice for American Settler Killed by Palestinian Stone-Throwers?

FBI Hasn't Prosecuted Anyone for Deaths in West Bank

Solemn Moment: Jewish settlers gather for funeral of Asher Palmer and his son, Yonathan, whose car was hit by stone-throwing Palestinians on the occupied West Bank in 2011.
getty images
Solemn Moment: Jewish settlers gather for funeral of Asher Palmer and his son, Yonathan, whose car was hit by stone-throwing Palestinians on the occupied West Bank in 2011.

By Michael Palmer

Published April 04, 2013, issue of April 12, 2013.
  • Print
  • Share Share
  • Multi Page

Two FBI special agents sat across from me in a conference room at the J. Edgar Hoover Building, in Washington. It was late October last year, shortly after Sukkot. We were discussing the deaths of my son Asher Palmer, and my grandson Yonatan Palmer, who were murdered on a Friday afternoon, September 23, 2011.

That day, Asher had strapped Yonatan into his car seat and headed to his in-laws in Jerusalem, where he expected to spend the Sabbath with his wife. Soon after they left, Asher drove onto a two-lane highway just outside the West Bank settlement of Kiryat Arba; a taxicab sped toward him, its rear window rolled down. The cab swerved close to Asher’s lane, and a football-size rock was thrown from the back seat, crashing through his windshield. Asher’s car veered off the road and rolled over. The cab sped off.

We can’t know Asher’s reactions at that moment. The police found no skid marks on the road, and theorized that the stone had knocked Asher unconscious, leaving him unable to brake or to control his car. Asher was just shy of his 25th birthday. Yonatan was nearly 1 year old. Both were declared dead by the first responders.

Wa’al al-Arjeh drove the cab. Ali Saadeh threw the rock. Al-Arjeh later said that he had worked for the security and intelligence forces of the Palestinian Authority for nearly 10 years. Saadeh was responsible for a number of other attacks against Jews.

On October 4, 2011, Israeli security forces arrested Saadeh, al-Arjeh and three of their accomplices, who confessed to the attack. A fourth member of al-Arjeh’s gang was arrested several days later. A series of trials followed, with al-Arjeh convicted of murder in early April, and Saadeh now awaiting his own verdict.

Asher was an American citizen. The United States Department of Justice therefore was supposed to have responded immediately to the murders with its own set of prescribed actions: assigning an FBI rapid deployment team to the region, opening an FBI investigation and establishing a joint task force with the Department of State.

American law makes overseas attacks on Americans the DOJ’s highest priority.

Not one action, I learned, had been taken for Asher. Not even a preliminary inquiry. So 13 months had passed since the murders (now 18 months), and I was sitting in an FBI office, trying to understand why. The FBI agents explained: They preferred to open “value added” investigations.

Mine, however, was not an isolated complaint. To date, the United States has not prosecuted a single Palestinian for attacking an American in Israel or in a P.A.-controlled location, but in the past two decades alone, as many as 143 Americans have been killed or badly injured. Were all of these cases also deemed unworthy?

The DOJ’s hands-off policy was acutely in evidence in the fall of 2011, when Israel made a deal with Hamas and freed 1,027 convicted criminals in exchange for hostage Gilad Shalit. Fifteen of the released terrorists had murdered or maimed Americans, but the DOJ essentially did nothing more than gather information. No hot pursuits, no indictments, no extraditions.

A group of 54 of America’s congressmen, no longer willing to abide DOJ negligence, wrote a bipartisan letter in March 2012 to Attorney General Eric Holder, urging him to adhere to the mandates of the law of the United States.

A DOJ public email, disseminated shortly afterward, raised hopes of a more concerted effort to follow, and the DOJ did seem to step up its support services for victims’ families; however, it still is failing to vigorously pursue a complete course of justice, and hardly “taking the matter of prosecuting terrorists very seriously,” as the email claimed.

Congress must increase its pressure on the DOJ so that it finally acts effectively. Moreover, American lawmakers should anticipate another negotiated terrorist release, and should task officials with formulating a plan to intervene long before that occurs.

At a minimum, the United States must demand that Palestinians who have harmed Americans be excluded from release in Israeli-P.A./Hamas deal-making and that they do not receive sanctuary in P.A. territory.

Justice and deterrence are pillars that ensure a society’s integrity and safety. Permitting terrorists with American blood on their hands to walk away scot-free, under any circumstances, is not just an abuse of the rights of victims and their families — it is bad policy.

Which brings us back to the murderers of Asher and Yonatan. With premature prisoner release a regrettable fact of life, the DOJ has to act now to ensure that the United States will be well positioned to keep their killers behind bars.

If, in the end, Wa’al al-Arjeh, Ali Saadeh and their accomplices do not get the punishments they deserve, the United States will have failed once again to honor its pact with victims and with society. We, and Congress as our representative, must not let that happen.

Michael Palmer is the father/grandfather of Asher and Yonatan Palmer. Jeff Daube, the Israel director of the Zionist Organization of America, contributed to this opinion piece.


The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.





Find us on Facebook!
  • "'What’s this, mommy?' she asked, while pulling at the purple sleeve to unwrap this mysterious little gift mom keeps hidden in the inside pocket of her bag. Oh boy, how do I answer?"
  • "I fear that we are witnessing the end of politics in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. I see no possibility for resolution right now. I look into the future and see only a void." What do you think?
  • Not a gazillionaire? Take the "poor door."
  • "We will do what we must to protect our people. We have that right. We are not less deserving of life and quiet than anyone else. No more apologies."
  • "Woody Allen should have quit while he was ahead." Ezra Glinter's review of "Magic in the Moonlight": http://jd.fo/f4Q1Q
  • Jon Stewart responds to his critics: “Look, obviously there are many strong opinions on this. But just merely mentioning Israel or questioning in any way the effectiveness or humanity of Israel’s policies is not the same thing as being pro-Hamas.”
  • "My bat mitzvah party took place in our living room. There were only a few Jewish kids there, and only one from my Sunday school class. She sat in the corner, wearing the right clothes, asking her mom when they could go." The latest in our Promised Lands series — what state should we visit next?
  • Former Israeli National Security Advisor Yaakov Amidror: “A cease-fire will mean that anytime Hamas wants to fight it can. Occupation of Gaza will bring longer-term quiet, but the price will be very high.” What do you think?
  • Should couples sign a pre-pregnancy contract, outlining how caring for the infant will be equally divided between the two parties involved? Just think of it as a ketubah for expectant parents:
  • Many #Israelis can't make it to bomb shelters in time. One of them is Amos Oz.
  • According to Israeli professor Mordechai Kedar, “the only thing that can deter terrorists, like those who kidnapped the children and killed them, is the knowledge that their sister or their mother will be raped."
  • Why does ultra-Orthodox group Agudath Israel of America receive its largest donation from the majority owners of Walmart? Find out here: http://jd.fo/q4XfI
  • Woody Allen on the situation in #Gaza: It's “a terrible, tragic thing. Innocent lives are lost left and right, and it’s a horrible situation that eventually has to right itself.”
  • "Mark your calendars: It was on Sunday, July 20, that the momentum turned against Israel." J.J. Goldberg's latest analysis on Israel's ground operation in Gaza:
  • What do you think?
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.