U.S. Asks Germany to Publish Complete List of Nazi-Looted Artwork

1,400 Masterpieces Found in Munich Last Year

Unlikely Trove: A Munich man kept a billion-dollar trove of looted Jewish art in this apartment. Should authorities have done more to report the discovery?
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Unlikely Trove: A Munich man kept a billion-dollar trove of looted Jewish art in this apartment. Should authorities have done more to report the discovery?

By Reuters

Published November 07, 2013.

(page 2 of 2)

The haul, found in the flat of Cornelius Gurlitt, the son of a war-time art dealer, is among the most significant discoveries of works seized by the Nazi regime. It could be worth more than 1 billion euros ($1.3 billion), according to a German magazine, although officials declined to comment.

Gurlitt, who occasionally sold paintings to support himself, has since vanished.

A U.S. researcher said on Wednesday that Allied troops had seized more than 100 art works in 1945 from Gurlitt’s father, then gave them back about four years later.

Marc Masurovsky, who is part of a group that works to return Nazi-looted art to its owners, said documents in the U.S. National Archives showed most of the works were returned to the collector, Hildebrand Gurlitt.

At least one of the pieces listed in the documents appears to be among the 1,400 found at the apartment of Gurlitt’s son, Masurovsky said.



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