'Shul on the Beach' Makes Orthodox Waves in Los Angeles

Pacific Jewish Center Sits Between Sex Shop and Rehab Joint

On the Boardwark: The little “Shul on the Beach” is the pride and joy of one Rabbi Eliyahu Fink, a baby-faced 32-year-old rabbi with a conventional Orthodox education but some very unconventional views, and even more unconventional visitors to his congregation.
haaretz
On the Boardwark: The little “Shul on the Beach” is the pride and joy of one Rabbi Eliyahu Fink, a baby-faced 32-year-old rabbi with a conventional Orthodox education but some very unconventional views, and even more unconventional visitors to his congregation.

By Alison Kaplan Sommer

Published March 08, 2014.
  • Print
  • Share Share
  • Single Page

(page 2 of 2)

One memorable visitor, Fink recalls, was David, a Hare Krishna follower from a Jewish background, who came in on Friday nights and enjoyed listening to Fink’s sermons. “He came wearing the skirts, he had the ponytail with the shaved head. He sometimes had paint on from a Hare Krishna religious ceremony. He had these beads and each different bead stood for another name of God. But we let him come. After a time, he didn’t come for a while. And then not long ago, someone comes to me and says: ‘Rabbi, there’s this guy, I don’t know he slipped in, but be careful (because) I don’t know what’s going on with this guy.’”

When Fink greeted the Hare Krishna man, he saw that he was shaken up and asked what was wrong. “He said he stopped in ‘because I lost my son today.’ His 30-year-old son died of an overdose. He said ‘I just needed a place to pray.’ And then he told me that his wife had also died of an overdose at 30 years old. That’s what this guy was carrying with him….There are people like this here. If they don’t come here, where will they go?”

Fink was raised in a modern Orthodox family in Monsey, N.Y., but he took a more Haredi direction after attending the prestigious Ner Israel Rabbinical College in Baltimore and receiving his ordination. Married at 20, he worked in college and high school Jewish outreach, thought about a career in social work, but eventually enrolled in law school in L.A. That’s when a family member saw an ad for a position at the PJC shul.

“They had been looking for a rabbi for more than a year. They had a problem because it’s a very diverse community.” Fink’s very traditional background, combined with his youth and liberal politics, was acceptable to both the traditionalists and the less strictly religious members of the congregation.

He’s manned the pulpit for the past five years. The position was supposed to be a temporary, part-time job, but Fink says it soon became clear to him that he would make a much better rabbi than he would a lawyer. While his brick-and-mortar congregation is small, Fink tries, as a true member of the Internet generation, to serve a wider online congregation through writing in support of greater acceptance and inclusion in the Jewish world. The goal of his blog, Fink or Swim and on social media, is to “bring my message to a broader audience and bring people into my community even if they don’t live here” and to give a voice to “passionate and compassionate Orthodox Judaism.” He is a frequent critic of what he sees as fundamentalist Orthodox views and argues passionately for the more open-minded, inclusive approach he puts into practice at PJC.

Gender equality, however, is a sticky subject. Online, he is an enthusiastic supporter of egalitarian “Open Orthodoxy” and supports the Women of the Wall. But as a congregational rabbi of a synagogue belonging to the Orthodox Union network, he feels bound by responsibility to his congregants to maintain a traditional Orthodox synagogue. He takes pains to point out that the gender-separating mehitza is down the middle of the sanctuary and women are not relegated to the back. However, he admits that he imposes more traditional limitations on women’s public participation in prayer then he would like.

While the PJC is unusual even by Los Angeles Orthodox standards, Fink finds the city’s Orthodox community as a whole very different from those on the East Coast. “The Orthodox L.A. Jewish community is way more diverse and way more tolerant than almost any other heavily Orthodox community that I’ve seen…There are relationships that cross what are usually considered uncrossable boundaries in the Orthodox Jewish community.”

Many of his real-life and many of his virtual congregants are those who left Orthodoxy. He has an affinity for the so-called “Off the derech” community partly, he admits, because many of his former yeshiva classmates see him as having fallen away from the true path. He views it as his special mission to be a sympathetic and understanding Orthodox rabbi who respects and withholds judgment on individuals who have left strictly Orthodox or Haredi communities.

“I used to think that it was easier to leave Orthodox Judaism than it is to stay – that those who leave are weak. That’s what I was taught in the Orthodox world. But I’ve discovered that it’s the actually the opposite. It takes a tremendous amount of strength to leave and most do because they are in a tremendous amount of pain. And if someone is in pain because of a world that I am a part of, if I can do anything to alleviate their pain, I will do it.”

For more stories, go to Haaretz.com or to subscribe to Haaretz, click here and use the following promotional code for Forward readers: FWD13.


The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.





Find us on Facebook!
  • Law professor Dan Markel waited a shocking 19 minutes for an ambulance as he lay dying after being ambushed in his driveway. Read the stunning 911 transcript as neighbor pleaded for help.
  • Happy birthday to the Boy Who Lived! July 31 marks the day that Harry Potter — and his creator, J.K. Rowling — first entered the world. Harry is a loyal Gryffindorian, a matchless wizard, a native Parseltongue speaker, and…a Jew?
  • "Orwell would side with Israel for building a flourishing democracy, rather than Hamas, which imposed a floundering dictatorship. He would applaud the IDF, which warns civilians before bombing them in a justified war, not Hamas terrorists who cower behind their own civilians, target neighboring civilians, and planned to swarm civilian settlements on the Jewish New Year." Read Gil Troy's response to Daniel May's opinion piece:
  • "My dear Penelope, when you accuse Israel of committing 'genocide,' do you actually know what you are talking about?"
  • What's for #Shabbat dinner? Try Molly Yeh's coconut quinoa with dates and nuts. Recipe here:
  • Can animals suffer from PTSD?
  • Is anti-Zionism the new anti-Semitism?
  • "I thought I was the only Jew on a Harley Davidson, but I was wrong." — Gil Paul, member of the Hillel's Angels. http://jd.fo/g4cjH
  • “This is a dangerous region, even for people who don’t live there and say, merely express the mildest of concern about the humanitarian tragedy of civilians who have nothing to do with the warring factions, only to catch a rash of *** (bleeped) from everyone who went to your bar mitzvah! Statute of limitations! Look, a $50 savings bond does not buy you a lifetime of criticism.”
  • That sound you hear? That's your childhood going up in smoke.
  • "My husband has been offered a terrific new job in a decent-sized Midwestern city. This is mostly great, except for the fact that we will have to leave our beloved NYC, where one can feel Jewish without trying very hard. He is half-Jewish and was raised with a fair amount of Judaism and respect for our tradition though ultimately he doesn’t feel Jewish in that Larry David sort of way like I do. So, he thinks I am nuts for hesitating to move to this new essentially Jew-less city. Oh, did I mention I am pregnant? Seesaw, this concern of mine is real, right? There is something to being surrounded by Jews, no? What should we do?"
  • "Orwell described the cliches of politics as 'packets of aspirin ready at the elbow.' Israel's 'right to defense' is a harder narcotic."
  • From Gene Simmons to Pink — Meet the Jews who rock:
  • The images, which have since been deleted, were captioned: “Israel is the last frontier of the free world."
  • As J Street backs Israel's operation in Gaza, does it risk losing grassroots support?
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.