Beth Kissileff


Embezzlement Drama Wins Israel's Top Literary Prize

By Beth Kissileff

The biggest point of contention with this year’s Sapir Prize, Israel’s equivalent to the Booker, was who the judges were and how they came to their shortlist of five nominees. But controversy should not take away from the achievement of winner Noa Yedlin for her “Ba’alat Bayit” or “House Arrest,” her second novel. Yedlin works as a journalist and is currently the deputy editor of the weekend magazine of the Ma’ariv newspaper; her first book was a collection of her columns “You ask, God replies” (2005), and her second a novel, “Track Changes” (2010). As winner, Yedlin will receive a 150,000 NIS prize, translation of her novel into Arabic and into another language of her choice.Read More


A Uniquely Israeli Vision of the Afterlife

By Beth Kissileff

A Uniquely Israeli Vision of the Afterlife
Despite the fact that Ofir Touché Gafla’s latest novel is an Israeli book, it does not touch directly on Israeli life. What it offers instead is a memorable vision of the afterlife.Read More


Bar and Bat Mitzvahs Critical to Future of Jewish Community

By Beth Kissileff

Bar and Bat Mitzvahs Critical to Future of Jewish Community
When my oldest daughter had her bat mitzvah, one of my proudest moments did not occur during the ceremony, though she certainly invested time and hard work in preparing. It came early Sunday morning when we were deciding what to do with the leftover food from our huge Shabbat Kiddush. My daughter suggested that we bring it to a shelter for women and children that she had volunteered at with her school, the Heilicher Minneapolis Jewish Day School.Read More


Why Can't Yeshiva Alumni Follow Horace Mann Blueprint on Abuse Scandal?

By Beth Kissileff

Why Can't Yeshiva Alumni Follow Horace Mann Blueprint on Abuse Scandal?
Facing a sex abuse scandal, Horace Mann alumni have demanded action from their prestigious alma mater. Why doesn’t the Jewish world demand the same from Yeshiva?Read More


Dedicating SOTU Moment to Slain Dad

By Beth Kissileff

Dedicating SOTU Moment to Slain Dad
As far as Sami Rahamim knows, the seating at the State of the Union address is random. He told the Forward that there “were couples invited who were separated.” His seat, as the guest of his congressman, Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), was “up in the gallery, facing the President on the left side.”Read More






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