Gil Shefler


Can Sheinkin Street Survive a Spiff-Up?

By Gil Shefler

Can Sheinkin Street Survive a Spiff-Up?
Sheinkin Street is to Tel Aviv what St. Marks Place is to New York: a playground for poets, posers, and fashionistas. Old-timers fear urban renewal could end the fun.Read More


Finding New Life As a Cult Classic

By Gil Shefler

Finding New Life As a Cult Classic
Take a barefoot American hippie clad in a rabbit-skin jacket and a bowler hat, trying to run away from the traumatic memories of the Vietnam War by traveling to Israel, of all places; a sexy redheaded vixen who can’t seem to keep her shirt on for longer than a few minutes, and a naive flower power couple happy to go along for the ride. Put them on a desert island surrounded by crude plastic prop sharks and murderous mimes, and what do you get? Probably the worst Israeli movie ever made, and a serious candidate for the worst movie of all time, which, surprisingly, is enjoying an unexpected revival 38 years after it was made.Read More


Israeli Turks Wrestle With Turkey’s Involvement in Gaza Flotilla Incident

By Gil Shefler

Israeli Turks Wrestle With Turkey’s Involvement in Gaza Flotilla Incident
Passions were flaring at the local Turkish Heritage Center. At a hastily organized meeting, participants — old and new Turkish immigrants to Israel and their descendents — debated in Hebrew and Turkish what, if anything, they could do to improve Israel’s plummeting image in Turkey.Read More


Can Pastrami Conquer the Palate in the Land of Hummus and Falafel?

By Gil Shefler

Can Pastrami Conquer the Palate in the Land of Hummus and Falafel?
At Ruben, a new restaurant with a distinctly American Jewish flavor, there’s almost no need for a menu; the thick smell of pastrami is like a business card for the eatery’s unabashed focus on smoked meats. Patrons can choose among freshly sliced heaps of pastrami, turkey or a mix, placed between two thin slices of rye with sauerkraut and a schmear of mustard, horseradish or harrisa — a Tunisian hot sauce that is one of the few concessions made to suit the local palate.Read More


Past and Present: Israel’s Impact on the Developing World

By Gil Shefler

Past and Present: Israel’s Impact on the Developing World
In 1958, Israel was a fledgling state barely able to provide for its own. It was beset on all sides by enemies threatening imminent attack and trying to cope with the absorption of hundreds of thousands of refugees. Nonetheless, that year it launched an ambitious initiative aimed at sharing its nation-building know-how with newly nascent countries in Africa and Asia that were gaining independence from colonial powers.Read More






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