Sheryl Sandberg's 'Lean In' Spotlights Shortage of Women in Top Tech Spots

Silicon Valley Trails Wall Street in Diversity

Men Only: Sheryl Sandberg offers plenty of advice for women in corporate America. Why is Silicon Valley even more of  a male preserve than Wall Street?
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Men Only: Sheryl Sandberg offers plenty of advice for women in corporate America. Why is Silicon Valley even more of a male preserve than Wall Street?

By Reuters

Published March 09, 2013.
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Sandberg’s book is the follow-up to talks she gave starting in 2010 on why the world has too few women leaders. After working at the U.S. Treasury Department, Sandberg scaled the heights of Silicon Valley, moving from Google to chief operating officer at Facebook while raising two children. The 43-year-old is adamant about making it home every night for dinner.

While the book does not come out until Monday, advance press for “Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead” has sparked a fierce debate between supporters and detractors on the Internet. A bestselling book could ensure the debate has practical results in workplaces across the United States.

“Lean In” offers tips for women in the workforce in general, such as how to command more respect through simple acts such as sitting tall at a conference table and speaking assertively at meetings.

Points like that might sound lightweight, but can have a big effect, says Theresia Gouw Ranzetta of venture firm Accel Partners, the firm known for backing Facebook in its early days.

“It impacts the way people perceive you,” she says. “But you have to have the substance to back it up.” She recalls receiving similar coaching early in her career when she worked as a management consultant at Bain & Co.

Kurtzig, now founder and chief executive of software start-up Kenandy, says too often she has seen women walk into a conference room and automatically head for chairs around the edges of the room rather than the main table. The message: “You’re a support person,” she says. “Not a main character.”

She is not as positive about Sandberg’s pitch for women to join “Lean In Circles,” or groups where they can support each other and learn how to achieve more success in their careers. “In business, you need to assimilate into the world, and the world is men and women,” she says.

Many technology veterans believe employers need to do more to help women gain entry to executive suites.


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