Modern Day Manna

Fellows at LABA Blend Jewish Texts With a Passion for Food

Under the Sukkah: Guests and fellows at the LABAlive Sukkot event were blindfolded and given a Persian cotton candy to eat. The idea was to immerse everyone in the stories by engaging multiple senses, explained LABA co-artistic director Elissa Strauss.
Courtesy of LABA/Elissa Struass
Under the Sukkah: Guests and fellows at the LABAlive Sukkot event were blindfolded and given a Persian cotton candy to eat. The idea was to immerse everyone in the stories by engaging multiple senses, explained LABA co-artistic director Elissa Strauss.

By Eitan Kensky

Published March 13, 2013, issue of March 22, 2013.
  • Print
  • Share Share
  • Single Page

(page 2 of 2)

LABA allows her to engage with food and flavors in a more cerebral way. It “brings a level of intellectualism into my baking that is otherwise missing,” she explained. Asked to bring in something based on a text that inspired her, Patinkin blended multiple lessons into one dessert. She noticed that the numbers 3, 5 and 7 kept reappearing in their sources and combined this insight with the talmudic opinion that the fig — and not the apple — was Adam and Eve’s forbidden fruit to make poppy fig hamantaschen, a three-pointed desserts. As Namdar says, “If… we manage to get to a place where she says ‘I’ll bake a fig dessert,’ that is for me a huge success.” It shows that she has managed to forget what she thought she knew about the biblical story, and instead to approach it as a new, careful reader.

Despite the clear signs of artistic influence so far, it’s too early to tell what final projects — which will be displayed in a festival early this summer — the fellowship will inspire.

Eli Valley, who is artist in residence at the Forward as well as a LABA fellow, is in the middle of the creative process. He’s decided to work on the Akkedah (the binding of Isaac) and the animal imagery that follows Jacob throughout his life; it is an extension of a provocative comparison of the idea of birthright in Genesis and The Black Cat Mystery comic “THE WEREWOLF MUST KILL!” he wrote for the LABA Journal.

But he hasn’t decided on the form of his final project. Will it be a comic, like his other work? A presentation? A combination? He is far from conclusions, and if his past creative process says anything about his present one, whatever sources his mind ultimately blends into his final project will come from accidentally finding “nuances/variations” of the theme repeated in other media. “Once you notice things,” he says, “it’s hard to dislodge them from your consciousness.”

Yet, even telling the story of the fellowship based on the final projects seems premature. LABA’s mission is to “use classic Jewish texts to inspire the creation of new art.” The hope, and vision, is that the year at LABA will spark an enduring interest in Jewish sources and influence Jewish culture makers to engage significantly with Judaism in their future work.

Krauss, for example, recently published a story in The New Yorker, “Zusya on the Roof,” that included an arresting house purification ritual from Leviticus, which calls for taking two birds, sacrificing one and letting the other go free. “He never read the passage without crying. But he shall let go the living bird out of the city into the open fields, and make atonement for the house: and it shall be clean.” It was a text she read at LABA.

But does this story, coming so soon after her participation in LABA, show an enduring engagement or a temporary fascination? In 30 years, will Krauss still look back to Leviticus for inspiration?

Or, to return to this year’s fellows: Will Patinkin again look to the Bible for recipe inspiration? Will the midrash be a normal part of finding unexpected flavor combinations? It will be years before we know how the story of this year’s LABA fellowship ends, how, precisely, it inspires its creators.

Eitan Kensky writes about Jewish American literature and popular culture.


The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.





Find us on Facebook!
  • Sigal Samuel's family amulet isn't just rumored to have magical powers. It's also a symbol of how Jewish and Indian rituals became intertwined over the centuries. http://jd.fo/a3BvD Only three days left to submit! Tell us the story of your family's Jewish heirloom.
  • British Jews are having their 'Open Hillel' moment. Do you think Israel advocacy on campus runs the risk of excluding some Jewish students?
  • "What I didn’t realize before my trip was that I would leave Uganda with a powerful mandate on my shoulders — almost as if I had personally left Egypt."
  • Is it better to have a young, fresh rabbi, or a rabbi who stays with the same congregation for a long time? What do you think?
  • Why does the leader of Israel's social protest movement now work in a beauty parlor instead of the Knesset?
  • What's it like to be Chagall's granddaughter?
  • Is pot kosher for Passover. The rabbis say no, especially for Ashkenazi Jews. And it doesn't matter if its the unofficial Pot Day of April 20.
  • A Ukrainian rabbi says he thinks the leaflets ordering Jews in restive Donetsk to 'register' were a hoax. But the disturbing story still won't die.
  • Some snacks to help you get through the second half of Passover.
  • You wouldn't think that a Soviet-Jewish immigrant would find much in common with Gabriel Garcia Marquez. But the famed novelist once helped one man find his first love. http://jd.fo/f3JiS
  • Can you relate?
  • The Forverts' "Bintel Brief" advice column ran for more than 65 years. Now it's getting a second life — as a cartoon.
  • Half of this Hillel's members believe Jesus was the Messiah.
  • Vinyl isn't just for hipsters and hippies. Israeli photographer Eilan Paz documents the most astonishing record collections from around the world:http://jd.fo/g3IyM
  • Could Spider-Man be Jewish? Andrew Garfield thinks so.
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.