What Kickstarter Is Good For

How Jews Can Harness the Power of Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding Is From Mars: An effort to raise money for a “Veronica Mars” movie based on the TV show has raised nearly $6 million.
Kickstarter
Crowdfunding Is From Mars: An effort to raise money for a “Veronica Mars” movie based on the TV show has raised nearly $6 million.

By Ezra Glinter

Published July 02, 2013, issue of July 05, 2013.
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The current sense of animosity began in March, when screenwriter Rob Thomas raised more than $2 million in less than 24 hours to make a movie based on his CW television network show “Veronica Mars,” which had been canceled in 2007. At the end of one month, the venture had received more than $5.7 million. Then in May, actor and director Zach Braff succeeded in getting more than $3.1 million for “Wish I Was Here,” a follow-up to his 2004 film, “Garden State.” Most recently James Franco, the actor, writer and artist everyone loves to hate, launched a campaign to make a film trilogy based on his own fiction, asking fans to kick in some $500,000.

Projects like these have prompted volumes of Internet debate about how platforms like Kickstarter are used. Should ordinary people be asked to fund for-profit projects that will be distributed by major companies? Should they bankroll celebrities who already have a lot more money than the rest of us? Is helping the rich and famous become more rich and more famous what crowdfunding is really all about?

I share these misgivings and have a few others, besides. In the wake of Hurricane Sandy I was solicited by crowdfunding campaigns for small businesses that had been destroyed or damaged by the storm. In most cases, I sympathized with those who had suffered losses. I wished for their success, but I was not willing to donate to a for-profit business as if it were a charitable cause. Perhaps if there had been an option for an interest-free loan, I might have been willing. But simply asking for free money to build, or rebuild, a business doesn’t strike me as an appropriate use of crowdfunding.

Fortunately, Kickstarter appeals aren’t always like that. In most cases, they’re for projects that are unlikely to ever make any money, for anybody. Independent films have been a major recipient of crowdfunding largesse: According to a 2012 article in The New York Times, 10% of the films at that year’s Sundance Film Festival had been funded by Kickstarter. There are plenty of accomplished artists who are not considered commercially viable but have been able to continue working thanks to Kickstarter. Legendary animator Ralph Bakshi, for example, has been able to start making a new film thanks to fans’ donations.

Yiddish, as it turns out, is another example of crowdfunding potential. Like many minority languages, it has lost much of its social and economic basis, but not its inherent value. All languages express unique aspects of human experience, and losing any of them, no matter what the reason, is a loss for humanity. The same thing could be said for all kinds of cultural expression. Symphony orchestras, for example, struggle regularly for survival, but that doesn’t mean there is no value in orchestral music.

This dilemma — how to maintain human creations that have lost their natural sources of sustenance — has always been with us. Shifting social and technological forces cause some things to grow and others to wither. But with the destruction wrought by the Internet, the issue is particularly acute. Journalism, as we all know, has been hit particularly hard. Daily newspapers in cities across the country have difficulty staying solvent, even though there is as much need for them now as ever.

But, to borrow a phrase, what the Internet taketh the Internet giveth away. I don’t believe that crowdfunding is the answer to all these problems, and it has a negative potential, as well. If it is used in place of sound business models, or is invoked by donors to turn down otherwise worthy causes, it will have done more harm than good. It should be seen as a supplement to other types of funding, not as a replacement for them. But even if it isn’t the answer, it is an answer, and a heartening one.

The success of crowdfunding is one of the wonders of the Internet, and as a society we shouldn’t take it lightly. The power of ordinary people to make things happen in the world simply because they want them to happen is an amazing phenomenon. It allows us to support all kinds of art and culture and human creativity that otherwise would never exist. It makes the world a better place to live in — for Yiddishists as well as for everyone else.

Ezra Glinter is the deputy arts editor of the Forward. Follow him on Twitter @EzraG


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