Philip Roth Isn't a Misogynist. Really.

Claudia Roth Pierpont Delivers a Master Class in Rothology

Letting Go: Philip Roth, 80, announced his retirement late last year.
Getty Images
Letting Go: Philip Roth, 80, announced his retirement late last year.

By Yevgeniya Traps

Published October 25, 2013, issue of November 01, 2013.

(page 2 of 2)

On the other hand, given some of the accusations Roth has encountered over the course of his writing career, the inclusion of this argument may perhaps be necessary. (Roth himself has made the point vociferously in his fiction, often through his writer-protagonist Nathan Zuckerman, whose travails are extensively covered in “Zuckerman Bound: A Trilogy and Epilogue.”)

She is critical of the work, calling out failures, as with “Letting Go,” Roth’s Jamesian first full-length novel, “The Breast,” which introduces David Kepesh and invokes Kafka in metaphor, if not in quality, “Our Gang,” Roth’s satirical but too broad attack on Nixon, and “I Married a Communist,” the oddly flat middle part of the so-called “American Trilogy,” bookended by the triumphs of “American Pastoral” and “The Human Stain.” But she is mostly in accordance with mainstream critical reception.

All the same, Pierpont is an attentive reader of Roth’s work: that she is a fan and an advocate is, at moments, a tremendous asset. And she is downright eloquent about those books she most ardently admires: Her chapter on “Sabbath’s Theater,” which extols Roth’s use of language in the creation of Mickey Sabbath and his lover Drenka, is a kind of meta-exegesis, in which her own language rises to the heights she is describing in Roth. That is, until she overreaches, likening Roth’s treatment of Time (the capitalization is hers) to Proust’s. This after earlier submitting that “[a]s a novelist, Roth is more psychologist than poet.”

Pierpont is also particularly passionate, though less successful, in defending Roth against the accusations of woman hatred consistently leveled at him by, in Pierpont’s telling, “feminists” and female reviewers. She is adamant that Roth does not hate women, that in fact his female characters, including the harridans, like Lucy Nelson in “When She Was Good” and Maureen Tarnopol in “My Life As a Man,” are simply as complicated as the men they make suffer.

Pierpont links both Lucy and Maureen to Margaret Williams, Roth’s first wife, a woman he married after she told him she was pregnant and planned to leave the child on his parents’ doorstep, in exchange for an abortion, only to find, some years into the marriage, that she had never really been pregnant at all. Anyway, Pierpont assures the reader, Roth could not be a hater of women because “[h]e considers himself a man who loves women, and he counts many women among his close and lifelong friends.”

I actually don’t think Philip Roth is a misogynist. Or at least I didn’t until I read that he couldn’t possibly be one because he has female friends.

“Roth Unbound” takes its title from an early Zuckerman book, “Zuckerman Unbound,” the 1981 novel exploring the relationship between a writer and his work. “Roth Unbound” tackles the same concerns, but I’m not sure it adds much to the exploration. And yet this criticism is in itself a testament to Pierpont’s “celebrated subject”: So good a writer is Roth, so good a thinker when it comes to his writing, that the most poignant, accurate and piercing of what might be said about his work has already been amply said by him, even if only in fiction, or perhaps because only in fiction.

Yevgeniya Traps writes frequently about the arts for the Forward.

Video: Nate Lavey


Would you like to receive updates about new stories?






















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.