Jeff Jacoby Tweets Prayers and Thanks as Search for Son Caleb Jacoby Goes On

Boston Globe Columnist's Jewish Day School Son Missing


By Forward Staff

Published January 09, 2014.

Update: The Newton police department has tweeted that Caleb Jacoby may have ties there.

Jeff Jacoby Tweeted thanks and scripture on Thursday morning as the Boston Globe columnist continued to lead an outpouring of concern about his missing teenage son, Caleb Jacoby.

“Never have the words ‘prayers’ & ‘praying’ so dominated my email inbox,” Jacoby said in a tweet at about 2 a.m. Thursday. “The outpouring of concern for Caleb has been incredibly heartening.”

Caleb Jacoby hasn’t been seen or heard from since midday Monday.

The worried dad also revealed that Caleb Jacob’s younger brother Micah has been reciting Psalm 121, which in part reads: “The Lord will keep you from all harm, he will watch over your life.”

“Our 10-yr-old, Micah, has been reciting Psalm 121 each morning & night since his big brother Caleb went missing,” Jeff Jacoby Tweeted.

At the Maimonides School in Brookline, Mass., students and faculty mobilized to locate one of their own.

At the school’s computer lab, kids were working social media, spreading Caleb’s photo around the Internet. The lunch room had turned into a gathering spot for search volunteers, serving up trays of bagels and urns of coffee. About 200 volunteers are participating in the search, which has extended into Boston.

“The school will continue to engage all of its resources to aid Caleb’s parents and the Brookline Police,” Head of School Naty Katz said in a statement. “Our entire school community is praying for Caleb’s safe return and we are deeply appreciative of the outpouring of support.”

After morning prayers, Rabbi Mordechai Soskil, the middle and upper school’s Judaic studies principal, acknowledged the difficulty of the day.

“We are here supporting the 340 kids that are here today,” Soskil said. “For the vast majority, it means going to class. The best thing to do for vast majority is to let them know that life is predictable. For a handful of kids, mostly 11th graders, the best thing is to give then an outlet. We are telling kids everyone here cares about them and thinks about them. We are concerned about Caleb, but there’s the same level of concern for everyone here.”

On Wednesday, Brookline Police Captain Thomas Keaveney told MassLive.com that law enforcement was “leaning more toward” treating the case as a runaway, rather than an abduction.

The police in Newton, Massachussetts, tweeted on Thursday that Caleb may have ties there, and for citizens to contact them with any information.

One of Caleb’s classmates, Adele Buff, was heading up the social media effort. Mid-morning, there were 15 kids typing away at computers and using cell phones to spread the word.

“We are contacting as many people as we can, at colleges, YMCAs and organizations, to let them know about Caleb and to contact us or the Brookline police,” Buff said. “We created a blog. We are getting a lot of feedback from people who want to help spread the word. He’s a quite, good kid.”

With JTA



Would you like to receive updates about new stories?






















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.