White House Releases Statement Marking Purim

Includes a Recipe for Hamantaschen

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By JTA

Published March 16, 2014.

The White House released a statement marking Purim that includes a recipe for hamantaschen, the holiday’s traditional snack.

The statement was released Friday, in advance of the beginning of the holiday Saturday night. It retells the Purim story of the ancient Persian Jews’ triumph over evil, and notes that “these themes resonate throughout the centuries and in today’s world as well. By speaking up and speaking out, justice will triumph over evil.”

The statement also includes a description of hamantaschen, the three-cornered pastries traditionally served on the holiday. It ends with a hamantaschen recipe, as well as a recipe for burekas, another traditional three-cornered food.

Per the statement:

Here are two hamantaschen recipes, one an easy take on the classic Ashkenazic (Eastern European) hamantaschen and the other a three-cornered savory treat from Sephardic cuisine. The recipes are provided by Susan Barocas, who most recently led the launch of the Jewish Food Experience project in Washington, DC.

Easy Hamantashen

This recipe makes a non-diary, crispy pastry that is good with a variety of fillings. The oranges juice and zest add extra flavor. The dough also makes a good cookie including thumb print that can be filled as desired.

Ingredients

5-5 1/2 cups all-purpose flour*

3 teaspoons baking powder

4 eggs

3/4 cup vegetable oil

3/4 cup sugar

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1/4 cup orange juice or water

2 teaspoon grated orange rind

Fillings of choice including poppy seed (mohn in Yiddish), prune butter (lekvar), hazelnut chocolate spread, lemon curd, thick fruit preserve, crumbled halvah

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease baking sheet or cover with parchment paper. Add flour and baking power to a bowl and blend with a dry whisk. Use the whisk to beat the eggs in separate larger bowl. Add oil, sugar, vanilla and orange juice or water and beat until well blended and creamy. Mix in grated rind. Add flour mixture to the wet ingredients gradually, mixing in completely each time with a wooden spoon. Once the dough can be formed into a ball not too sticky to handle, knead it together until smooth.

All of the steps up to this point can also be done in a food processor fit with steel blades. Blend the wet ingredients, then add the flour gradually until a ball forms and continue to roll, fill and fold.

Once the dough is in a smooth ball, pull off a large piece and roll to ¼ inch thick on a lightly floured board or counter. Cut into 3 to 3 1/2-inch rounds; the top of a glass works quite well. Place about 1 teaspoon of filling of choice in the center of each round. Moisten around the edge of the dough circle, then fold into a triangle, pinching each corner closed and leaving some filling showing. Bake 20 to 25 minutes just until starting to barely golden brown. Yield: about 3 dozen

*To add some whole grain, you can trade out up to half the all-purpose flour for white whole wheat flour.



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