Johnna Kaplan


The Foodlums of Connecticut

By Johnna Kaplan

The Foodlums of Connecticut
Connecticut is home to a surprising number of Jewish farms, foodies — and a whisky company. Our secret Jewish history of farming in the state explains why.Read More


The Mikveh in My Backyard

By Johnna Kaplan

The site of the Chesterfield synagogue Read More


Demystifying the Single Life

By Johnna Kaplan

Demystifying the Single Life
Sara Eckel’s new book, “It’s Not You: 27 (Wrong) Reasons You’re Single,” may be in the relationship section of the bookstore, but it’s not quite like its neighbors on the shelf. “It’s Not You” contains no “helpful” tips about all the things you must be doing wrong if you’re a woman of a certain age who’s still not partnered up. Instead, the book debunks one by one the usual litany of “reasons” for singlehood, from “You have low self-esteem” to “You’re too picky.” In this humorous and compassionate volume, Eckel — who met her husband-to-be at 39 and married him at 44 — distills research, interviews and personal observations into an honest and possibly revolutionary take on single lifeRead More


Randi Zuckerberg's 'Dot Complicated'

By Johnna Kaplan

Randi Zuckerberg's 'Dot Complicated'
It’s been a good (or perhaps bad) year for normal-woman outrage. I’m still pretty irked about being told to “Lean In,” and now there is yet another book by an uber-successful (and uber-lucky) woman who thinks her life lessons apply to the rest of us. If you haven’t guessed, I’m talking about former Facebook marketing director Randi Zuckerberg’s “Dot Complicated,” in which a one-percenter who was born in 1982, went to Harvard, and thinks her hometown of Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. — which the New York Times once called “Exclusive on the Hudson” — is “typically suburban,” tells the rest of us how to live online.Read More


Falling Through Cracks That Sandy Made

By Johnna Kaplan

Falling Through Cracks That Sandy Made
One year ago, much of the Northeast went dark in a violent rush of wind, and the water started to rise. One week after Sandy hit, I wrote about how I spent the days immediately following the storm, eating frozen Rosh Hashanah honey cake and surrounding myself with candles and flashlights. At the time it seemed like a momentary surreal interlude, like everything would eventually revert to normal and all would be righted. For me, and many others, that did not happen.Read More



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