Oenophile-Tested, Rabbi-Approved Wines for Your Seder

We’ve been hearing it for years: kosher wine has come a long way. Sweet wines, dubbed by some as the 11th plague, are no longer the only option for Passover.

Here’s a roundup of oenophile-tested, rabbi-approved picks for this year’s Seder table:

The granddaddy of wine publications has picks for all budgets, from a $13 Baron Herzog Zinfandel to a $150 Covenant Cabernet Sauvignon. Look for more options using their online Wine Searcher. [Wine Spectator]

Kosher wines from South Africa and the Pacific Northwest, including a mevushal (pasteurized) selection that can be poured by non-Jews. [The Daily Meal]

It’s all about reds, according to these New York wine professionals. [The Wall Street Journal]

Wine critic Eric Asimov reviews a dozen options (two mevushal) starting at $16. [The New York Times]

A look at five mevushal varieties from Napa Valley’s Hagafen Cellars. [Palate Press]

Maple Leaf Jews are covered with 20 picks under $20. [Canada.com]

A focus on Israeli wines under the Yarden’s umbrella. [The San Francisco Examiner]

Four non-mevushal picks from Israel, Bordeaux and California. [The Wine Cellar Insider]

Recommended bottles from $9 and up. [Pittsburgh Post-Gazette]

Your Stories

  • "This holiday we take for ourselves,
 no longer silent servers behind the curtain, 
but singers of the seder,
 with voices of gladness,
 creating our own convocation,
 and leaving ‘The Narrow Place’ together."E.M. Broner

  • "The idea of opening the door is that we hope Elijah might actually be there this year – that we might actually have done enough to change the world to have had him arrive. And, if we don’t have even the tiniest bit in us that thinks he might be there, that thinks we have tried our hardest to bring around a messianic time, with no hunger, no war, no conflict, no pain – if we don’t believe that we have tried to end those broken parts in the world – well, then I tell my students – don’t do any of it."Rabbi Leora Kaye

  • "The whole seder, for me, is the tension between two statements: We say, 'We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt and now we’re free,' but before that, we pick up the matzoh, we invite the hungry in and we say, 'This year we are slaves, next year may we be free.' We are the most fortunate, liberated Jews in history. But on the other hand, there are lots of things that enslave us."Rabbi Arthur Green

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