Northern Italian Tortellini for Rosh Hashanah

Tortellini are traditionally made with veal, prosciutto and cheese. Since the combining of milk and meat and the use of pork products are forbidden according to Jewish dietary laws, this recipe features two meats and spices to create a flavorful stuffing for the delicious pillows of dough.

Traditionally, sealed foods such as this stuffed pasta are served at the New Year to symbolize our hopes to be “sealed” in the book of good health and prosperity for the coming year.

Makes 3–4 dozen tortellini

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
¼ cup finely chopped onion
4 ounces ground veal or ground turkey thigh
4 ounces ground turkey breast
1 large egg
2–3 tablespoons fresh breadcrumbs
¼ teaspoon nutmeg
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Fresh pasta dough (see recipe below) or ½ pound fresh pasta sheets

1) Heat a 10-inch frying pan for 20 minutes over high heat. Add the olive oil and heat for another 15 seconds. Reduce the heat to medium and add the onion. Sauté until onions are soft and slightly golden.

2) Add the veal (or ground turkey thigh) and the turkey breast meat to the pan and stir constantly until turkey is cooked and broken into fine pieces.

3) Remove from heat, place in a 2-quart bowl and add the egg, breadcrumbs and spices. Combine well and set aside while you prepare the dough.

4) If making your own dough, roll the dough out into sheets that are thin (or about a No. 2 if using a non-electric pasta machine).

5) Cut dough into 2-inch squares with a knife or fluted edged cutter. Have the square laid out with the point on top like a diamond and place a small teaspoon of filling in the center.

6) Rub a little water around the edges and fold dough over filling to create a triangle. Press to seal edges.

7) Brush a little water on the left point of the triangle. Bring the two side points down and overlap right over left slightly to form a pillow. Pinch to seal.

8) Cook in boiling salted water for a minute or two (fresh dough cooks very fast) and serve in chicken soup.

FRESH PASTA
2 large eggs
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons ice water
2 cups bread flour

1) Place eggs in the food processor work bowl. Add the olive oil and the water and mix by turning the processor on and off twice.

2) Add one cup of the flour and turn the processor on for 5 seconds. Scrape the sides of the bowl.

3) Add the other cup of flour and process for 10 seconds longer. Dough will be crumbly. Pinch a little bit of dough, if it holds together it is ready to be rolled.

4) Remove the dough and divide in half. Place on a lightly floured surface, cover and allow to rest for 10 minutes or longer if you are rolling dough by hand.

5) Prepare pasta according to machine directions. After filling dough according to directions above, cook in boiling salted water to which 1 tablespoon of oil has been added. Cook pasta until al dente. Fresh pasta will cook in as little as 1 minute. Serve in soup or with your favorite sauce.

Tina Wasserman is the food editor of URJ.org and author of “Entrée to Judaism” and “Entrée to Judaism for Families.” Her website is cookingandmore.com

Northern Italian Tortellini for Rosh Hashanah

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Northern Italian Tortellini for Rosh Hashanah

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