Skip To Content
JEWISH. INDEPENDENT. NONPROFIT.

Support the Forward

Funded by readers like you DonateSubscribe
The Schmooze

Godard To Skip Honorary Oscar Ceremony

Did a Forward story influence Jean-Luc Godard’s decision to cancel a trip to accept an honorary Oscar?

After the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced it would bestow a lifetime achievement award on the idiosyncratic French-born, Swiss-based filmmaker, the Forward’s Benjamin Ivry laid out Godard’s history of anti-Semitic and anti-Israel statements in “Are They Giving an Oscar to an AntiSemite?” published October 8. Most famously, Ivry noted, Godard has called Israel “a cancer on the map of the Middle East” and compared Palestinian suicide bombers to Jews in the Holocaust who sacrificed “themselves to bring into existence the State of Israel.”

Ivry’s page-one article sparked a firestorm in the blogosphere and media across the world, and organizations including the Zionist Organization of America forcefully condemned the Academy’s decision. Still, Godard had apparently planned to accept the award in person on November 13 at the Oscars ceremony in Hollywood — until yesterday.

On Monday, the Academy issued an upbeat statement that tried to paint a happy face on what was clearly becoming an embarrassment. “Following a two-month cordial exchange of correspondence with Academy president Tom Sherak, Jean-Luc Godard has regretfully notified Sherak that he will not be able to attend the [award dinner],” the statement opened. “‘He reiterated his thanks for the award,’ reported Sherak, ‘and also sent his good wishes to the other individuals being honored the same night — Kevin Brownlow, Francis Ford Coppola and Eli Wallach — who he refers to as the three other musketeers.’” Wallach, of course, is the legendary 93-year-old Jewish thespian.

As the Forward’s Ivry also reported, two recent books detailed a falling-out between Godard and French director François Truffaut after the former called a Jewish film producer “sale juif” (“dirty Jew”). Truffaut’s father, reportedly, was Jewish.

Incredibly, Godard had also been rumored to be preparing an adaptation of Daniel Mendelsohn’s acclaimed “The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million,” tracing the fate of six Holocaust victims.

Engage

Republish This Story

Please read before republishing

We’re happy to make this story available to republish for free, unless it originated with JTA, Haaretz or another publication (as indicated on the article) and as long as you follow our guidelines. You must credit the Forward, retain our pixel and preserve our canonical link in Google search.  See our full guidelines for more information, and this guide for detail about canonical URLs.

To republish, copy the HTML by clicking on the yellow button to the right; it includes our tracking pixel, all paragraph styles and hyperlinks, the author byline and credit to the Forward. It does not include images; to avoid copyright violations, you must add them manually, following our guidelines. Please email us at [email protected], subject line “republish,” with any questions or to let us know what stories you’re picking up.

We don't support Internet Explorer

Please use Chrome, Safari, Firefox, or Edge to view this site.