Second Suspect in Boston Marathon Bombing Captured

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Hid in Backyard Boat

Getty Images

By Reuters

Published April 19, 2013.

(page 2 of 3)

“We are so grateful to bring justice and closure to this case,” Massachusetts State Police Chief Colonel Timothy Alben told a news conference. “We are exhausted folks, but we had a victory here tonight.”

Monday’s bombing have been described by Obama as “an act of terrorism.” It was the worst such attack on U.S. soil since the plane hijackings of September 11, 2001, and set nerves on edge across the United States with a series of security scares.

Police cars and armored vehicles surrounded the house on Friday night shortly after police told a news conference that the suspect fled on foot and was still on the loose. After the capture of Tsarnaev, authorities said the investigation was still open.

Police in New Bedford, Massachusetts, 60 miles (96 km) south of Boston said three other people had been taken into custody for questioning about Monday’s bombings. No other details were provided.

Earlier on Friday, Alben said that officers went door-to-door in Watertown and searched houses. During the search for the men on Friday, two Black Hawk helicopters circled the area. SWAT teams moved through in formation, leaving an officer behind to ensure that searched homes remained secure, a law enforcement official said.

The normally traffic-clogged streets of Boston were empty on Friday as the city went into lockdown during the manhunt. Public transportation had been suspended and air space restricted. Famous universities, including Harvard and MIT, closed after police ordered residents to remain at home.

Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick said late on Friday afternoon the “stay-in-place” order for Boston had been lifted and mass transit reopened.

The brothers had not previously been on the radar as possible militants, U.S. government officials said. But the FBI in 2011 interviewed the older of the two brothers, acting at the request of an unidentified foreign government, a U.S. law enforcement source said. The matter was closed when it did not produce any derogatory information, according to the source, who declined to be identified.



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