J Street Loses Its Focus With Peace Process Dead

Lobby Should Fight Israel's Occupation, Not BDS

Adrift: Jeremy Ben-Ami, J Street’s leader, now needs to find a new raison d’etre for the group.
J Street
Adrift: Jeremy Ben-Ami, J Street’s leader, now needs to find a new raison d’etre for the group.

By Larry Derfner

Published June 09, 2014, issue of June 13, 2014.

(page 2 of 2)

And now J Street is moving on to the Presbyterian Church (USA)’s General Assembly in Detroit, June 14–21. There it will argue against a motion for divestment from Caterpillar, Hewlett-Packard and Motorola, whose bulldozers, segregated biometric identifications systems and surveillance services, respectively, are used by Israel in its military dictatorship over the Palestinians in the West Bank.

J Street was instrumental in beating back the same motion in 2012, when it failed before the church’s General Assembly by a vote of 333–331. But that was then. Then it was possible to argue (although I’d already stopped) that there was still hope that the United States would pressure Israel into making peace. Then it was still at least reasonable for J Street President Jeremy Ben-Ami to tell the Presbyterian Church, “Reject divestment, and embrace full-on pursuit of the diplomatic efforts necessary to create genuine and lasting peace for Israel and the Palestinian people.”

But now? What argument can an anti-occupation movement make to the Presbyterian Church in June 2014 about why it should not divest from Caterpillar’s bulldozers, Hewlett-Packard’s ID system for Palestinians and Motorola’s surveillance machines? Because it would interfere with U.S. diplomacy in the Middle East? Because it would harden the Netanyahu government’s stance in the peace talks?

From an anti-occupation perspective, what is there to lose by a Presbyterian Church vote for divestment? Nothing. But what is there to gain? A blow against injustice, the kind that has been scaring the Netanyahu government and Israel lobby like nothing else — certainly not the Obama administration — which is a very good sign that the BDS campaign is on to something.

This time around, J Street again will be joined in the opposition by at least one right-wing Zionist organization: NGO Monitor, headed by one of the world’s leading McCarthyite Zionists, Gerald Steinberg. A friend of mine was at a talk Steinberg gave late in May and said Steinberg was going on about how “he spends time working with the Presbyterians, documenting why divestment represents classic elements of anti-Semitism.” Great stuff.

But this is the sort of company J Street keeps these days in the only meaningful action it’s involved in anymore: fighting BDS.

I know that that’s not what J Street wants to be, but that’s effectively what it has become by offering no path to peace while opposing the one way that still shows any prospect of success.

If J Street still wants to help heal Israel and Palestine, and I have no doubt it does, let it act like a healer and remember the Hippocratic Oath: First do no harm.

Larry Derfner is an American-born Israeli journalist who blogs at +972 Magazine.



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