Brandeis Retired President Jehuda Reinharz Rakes in $500K Salary

In the three years since Brandeis University president Jehuda Reinharz stepped down from his office, he has been receiving a generous annual salary of up to $500,000, The Boston Globe reported.

The Globe quoted Gordon Fellman, a sociology professor at Brandeis, who said that there was “puzzlement from faculty why he gets paid at all.”

Reinharz, who is 69 and served as the University president from 1994 until 2011, does not teach classes, supervise students or attend faculty meetings, the paper said.

Reinharz countered that he helped Frederick Lawrence, the current president, to raise money for the University, and gives advice to him and other staffers.

“I’ve never worked at Brandeis by the hour,” he is quoted saying, when asked how much time he dedicates to this job. Reinharz also serves as the president of the Mandel Foundation, where he earns $800,000 annually, the Globe wrote.

Brandeis University published a response to the Boston Globe on the same day, writing that Reinharz had “an unparalleled fundraising record and strong relationships with people and organizations closely tied to Brandeis.” It further states that his president emeritus compensation – which ”was just slightly above the median amount paid to retired presidents at peer institutions” – will end in July 2014.

In last year’s salary survey of Jewish communal leaders in the U.S. conducted by the Forward, Brandeis University ranked third for annual salary of the executives of Jewish educational institutions, after Yeshiva University and Touro College. Brandeis University came second for total expenses, only topped by Yeshiva University. The University’s undergraduate tuition for the current academic year is $44,380.

The Globe cited Reinharz’s cushy deal as evidence of a growing trend in higher education towards gilded golden parachutes for top leaders.

It called ex-Boston University chief John Silber a pioneer in the practice, which some experts say drives up tuition costs. Silber persuaded BU to make him chancellor — at a higher salary — after quitting as president. Even after giving up the chancellorship in 2003, he received $6.1 million in 2005, mostly in deferred compensation, the paper said.

Author

Anna Goldenberg

Anna Goldenberg

Anna Goldenberg is the Forward’s culture fellow.

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Brandeis Retired President Jehuda Reinharz Rakes in $500K Salary

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