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Recipes

Egyptian Breakfast: Ful Medames With Fried Eggs

The wine in this dish is an unexpected and nontraditional addition, but it adds delicious flavor. Don’t worry about drinking before noon — the alcohol cooks out before the beans touch your plate. Serve with pita for mopping up the sauce.

For the Beans:

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling 1 large onion, finely chopped
4 large cloves garlic, chopped
1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes, or more to taste
2 plum tomatoes, seeded and finely chopped
1/4 cup dry red wine
2 15-ounce cans fava beans, with their liquid
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt, or more to taste
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
chopped fresh, flat-leaf parsley, for serving

For the Eggs: 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 4 eggs

1) Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a medium pan set over medium heat. Add onion, and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, 5–7 minutes. Add garlic, cumin, paprika, red pepper flakes and tomatoes, and cook, stirring, until fragrant, 1–2 minutes.

2) Stir in red wine, and cook, stirring occasionally, until tomatoes soften and most of the liquid has evaporated, 3–5 minutes. Add fava beans with their liquid and bring to a simmer; reduce heat to medium low, cover pan and simmer until beans are tender, about 10 minutes. Uncover and continue simmering until liquid thickens and reduces by about three quarters, 8–12 minutes. Stir in lemon juice, 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper, then remove from heat. Taste and add additional salt and red pepper flakes, if desired.

3) Make the eggs: Brush the vegetable oil around the bottom of a medium pan set over medium heat and let warm. Crack each egg into a small cup, then gently slide the eggs into the pan. Cover and cook, undisturbed, until the whites are firm and yolks are still soft, 3–4 minutes.

4) Divide beans and sauce between bowls or plates and carefully top each with a fried egg, a drizzle of olive oil and chopped fresh parsley.

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