In Terror, Satmar and Chabad Rabbis United

By Marissa Brostoff

Published December 04, 2008, issue of December 12, 2008.
  • Print
  • Share Share

While most of the media attention in the wake of the attack on the Chabad-run Nariman House in Mumbai has focused on slain Lubavitch emissaries Gavriel and Rachel Holtzberg, less noted was the death of a third Hasidic Jew in the assault, Aryeh Leibish Teitelbaum, a member of the Satmar sect. What makes Teitelbaum’s death particularly striking is that, though he and the Holtzbergs all came from Brooklyn, only in a city like Mumbai would they have eaten and prayed together in the same house.

MOURNING: In Jerusalem, rabbis carry the coffin of Satmar scion Aryeh Leibish Teitelbaum, slain in the terrorist attacks in Mumbai.
MOURNING: In Jerusalem, rabbis carry the coffin of Satmar scion Aryeh Leibish Teitelbaum, slain in the terrorist attacks in Mumbai.

In places like Brooklyn and Jerusalem, where the ultra-Orthodox population is large and diverse, members of the Chabad and Satmar communities — two of the largest and most prominent ultra-Orthodox groups — have kept their distance and at times have even fought openly.

While Chabad believes in extensive engagement with the non-Jewish world, Satmar rejects almost all such engagement, and while the Chabad movement is ardently Zionist, Satmar is a non-Zionist movement.

But in far-flung places with tiny Jewish populations, Chabad, which has outposts around the globe, is often the only outlet for kosher food and prayer services. Even though Chabad is best known for its outreach to non-Orthodox Jews, the tragedy in Mumbai illuminates the role that Chabad has played as a haven for fellow ultra-Orthodox travelers.

One of the most frequent obstacles to mixing between ultra-Orthodox sects is that they do not always accept each other’s kashrut certifications and thus cannot sit down to a meal together. It is especially telling that Teitelbaum, who was a kashrut supervisor and was in India overseeing canned mushroom production, was willing to take his meals there, according to Satmar community members who spoke to his family after his death.

“They made sure not only to have Chabad shchita [certification for kosher meat] but to have other shchita as well, so that others could be accommodated,” said Leib Glanz, a rabbi and community leader in one of Brooklyn’s Satmar enclaves, who had spoken with Teitelbaum’s father.

Teitelbaum was no ordinary member of the ultra-Orthodox Satmar sect. He was a scion of one of the group’s most prominent families.

The 38-year-old Teitelbaum was closely related by both blood and marriage to Zalman and Aaron Teitelbaum, the feuding brothers who serve as the chief rabbis of the two largest Satmar communities in the United States.

Teitelbaum’s father, Nacham Ephraim Teitelbaum, is the Velover rebbe, a title of distinction passed down through the generations. The father has the final say over what food qualifies for the Velover hechsher, a stamp of approval accepted by many of the strictest adherents to Jewish dietary law in the Satmar and other ultra-Orthodox sects.

“It’s one of the most powerful hekhshers in the Jewish community,” said Abe Deutsch, a leading member of the Satmar enclave in Williamsburg.

The younger Teitelbaum grew up in Brooklyn and moved to Jerusalem as an adult, where he married into one of Israel’s leading Satmar families. After the attacks last week, Teitelbaum’s body, like those of the Chabad couple, was flown back to Israel, but there they were separated again. While the Holtzbergs were buried in a public funeral, their coffins draped in Israeli flags, Teitelbaum was buried in a separate private ceremony in which Zionist iconography was banned.






Find us on Facebook!
  • Move over Dr. Ruth — there’s a (not-so) new sassy Jewish sex-therapist in town. Her name is Shirley Zussman — and just turned 100 years old.
  • From kosher wine to Ecstasy, presenting some of our best bootlegs:
  • Sara Kramer is not the first New Yorker to feel the alluring pull of the West Coast — but she might be the first heading there with Turkish Urfa pepper and za’atar in her suitcase.
  • About 1 in 40 American Jews will get pancreatic cancer (Ruth Bader Ginsberg is one of the few survivors).
  • At which grade level should classroom discussions include topics like the death of civilians kidnapping of young Israelis and sirens warning of incoming rockets?
  • Wanted: Met Council CEO.
  • “Look, on the one hand, I understand him,” says Rivka Ben-Pazi, a niece of Elchanan Hameiri, the boy that Henk Zanoli saved. “He had a family tragedy.” But on the other hand, she said, “I think he was wrong.” What do you think?
  • How about a side of Hitler with your spaghetti?
  • Why "Be fruitful and multiply" isn't as simple as it seems:
  • William Schabas may be the least of Israel's problems.
  • You've heard of the #IceBucketChallenge, but Forward publisher Sam Norich has something better: a #SoupBucketChallenge (complete with matzo balls!) Jon Stewart, Sarah Silverman & David Remnick, you have 24 hours!
  • Did Hamas just take credit for kidnapping the three Israeli teens?
  • "We know what it means to be in the headlines. We know what it feels like when the world sits idly by and watches the news from the luxury of their living room couches. We know the pain of silence. We know the agony of inaction."
  • When YA romance becomes "Hasidsploitation":
  • "I am wrapping up the summer with a beach vacation with my non-Jewish in-laws. They’re good people and real leftists who try to live the values they preach. This was a quality I admired, until the latest war in Gaza. Now they are adamant that American Jews need to take more responsibility for the deaths in Gaza. They are educated people who understand the political complexity, but I don’t think they get the emotional complexity of being an American Jew who is capable of criticizing Israel but still feels a deep connection to it. How can I get this across to them?"
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.