Nina Badzin


Santa and the Tooth Fairy — in a Jewish Home

By Nina Badzin

Santa and the Tooth Fairy — in a Jewish Home
Until my kids starting loosing their teeth, I considered myself a Jew without any Christmas influences. Sure, I’ve always given and received Hanukkah gifts, which one could argue is the most blatant Christmas influence of all. But I’ve draw the line when it comes to buying Christmas-inspired blue tinsel, blue and white lights, and other Christmas decorations in Hanukkah disguise.Read More


Back to Square One With B’nei Mitzvah

By Nina Badzin

Back to Square One With B’nei Mitzvah
As I listened to friends and family begrudgingly make decisions about Hebrew school for their kids this year, I started a conversation on my personal blog about alternatives to the typical after-school programs. As I mentioned, I was not asking on behalf of my own family.Read More


The Benefit of the Doubt for The New Year

By Nina Badzin

The Benefit of the Doubt for The New Year
In Rosh Hashanahs past, I focused on changes that required adding a new practice to my Jewish life. Nine years ago I bought a second set of dishes. Eight years ago I committed to weekly Torah study sessions with a partner. Seven years ago I began using the mikveh. I’ve made less daunting changes, too, like promising to light the Shabbat candles closer to the proper time, which worked well in the winter months, then not as well the rest of the time. The list goes on and on. Some “resolutions” stuck better than others. (The mivkeh lives on; now that I have four kids, the study sessions not so much.)Read More


Stop And Smell the... Boredom?

By Nina Badzin

This is the fourth and final post in a Sisterhood series by Nina Badzin on gadgets, family and work. Read More


The First World Problem of Prepping for Camp

By Nina Badzin

The First World Problem of Prepping for Camp
There’s a popular hashtag on Twitter called #FirstWorldProblems. People vent about issues lacking true urgency then toss the words #FirstWorldProblems at the end to acknowledge that their problems are the “problems” of the fortunate.Read More



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