Silencing of the Liberal American Jew

We've Allowed Noisy Minorities To Censor Our Voices

Silencing Liberal Voices: A Miami synagogue recently scrapped a talk by Debbie Wasserman Schultz after a powerful member who is a Republican complained.
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Silencing Liberal Voices: A Miami synagogue recently scrapped a talk by Debbie Wasserman Schultz after a powerful member who is a Republican complained.

By J.J. Goldberg

Published June 05, 2012, issue of June 08, 2012.
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When Miami’s Temple Israel canceled a scheduled Memorial Day talk by local Democratic Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, following a protest by a wealthy Republican donor, it did more than just insult an elected official. It laid down a significant new marker in the gradual silencing of American Jewry as a moral voice in the broader society.

The silencing has been so gradual, and so thorough, that few even notice it anymore. There was a time — for about a half-century after World War II — when the Jewish community’s main representative bodies played a leading role in national struggles for tolerance and equal rights, fighting for Jews and non-Jews alike. Combining organizational savvy, generous donors, a motivated base and the moral authority of history’s victims, the community gained a standing and clout beyond its numbers. And the nation was better for it.

No longer. The great Jewish civil rights agencies that once fought for a broad spectrum of progressive policies now devote the bulk of their resources narrowly to pro-Israel and anti-terrorism advocacy. Jewish federated charities, a multibillion-dollar network of social services heavily dependent on government dollars, are regularly blocked by tiny minorities of Republicans from advocating even the sorts of federal budgets that would ensure their own fiscal health. The range of our moral concerns as a faith community becomes ever narrower, ever more focused on ourselves. We are in danger of becoming, in classic Seinfeld fashion, a religion about nothing.

In the Miami incident, the congresswoman was invited to speak at the historic downtown temple following the May 25 Sabbath service where the daughter of a friend was to be confirmed. Her talk was canceled on one day’s notice after longtime congregation leader Stanley Tate, who chairs the Miami-Dade Romney campaign, publicly demanded the right of “rebuttal” and then resigned his temple membership. He complained that she chairs the Democratic National Committee, forgetting that she’s first of all an elected lawmaker.

The synagogue then canceled the congresswoman’s talk, citing “security” concerns. Wasserman Schultz correctly blamed the temple’s “internal politics.” “It is unfortunate that some would allow politics to stand in the way of citizens’ ability to interact with their representative,” she told the Sun-Sentinel.

Actually, it’s more than unfortunate. Yes, protests against government officials speaking at public institutions have become all too commonplace, a sign of broadly declining respect for the institutions of democracy. It’s worth remembering, though, that such objections, whether by liberals protesting the military or conservatives protesting abortion, rarely succeed. Even when bishops censure Catholic universities for hosting pro-choice commencement speakers — like President Obama at the University of Notre Dame in 2009, or Health and Human Services Secretary Katherine Sebelius at Georgetown this spring — respect for the office, for civic responsibility and democratic norms, nearly always comes first.

The Jewish community hasn’t shown the same firmness of spine. Determined campaigns by noisy minorities or threats by a handful of major donors regularly silence voices deemed controversial. The most familiar flashpoint is Israel, a subject so charged for so long that we’ve come to take the suppression of dissent for granted, like a perpetual toothache.

The disinviting of Wasserman Schultz takes the stifling of free discourse into a new and alarming realm. In this case, a hugely popular elected official has been prevented from speaking on matters of national concern to an audience that overwhelmingly agrees with her, within the walls of an institution that is committed to the sorts of liberal views she represents. All because one donor objects.


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