Steven G. Kellman


Dara Horn Offers Her Own 'Guide For the Perplexed'

By Steven G. Kellman

Dara Horn Offers Her Own 'Guide For the Perplexed'
Dara Horn’s novels recover vestiges of the Jewish past. Her latest, ‘A Guide For the Perplexed,’ jumps back and forth between America, England, and Cairo.Read More


Marco Roth's Frustration and Triumph

By Steven G. Kellman

Marco Roth's Frustration and Triumph
Marco Roth’s new memoir charts the his struggle to understand his elusive and beloved father, who died of AIDS. The lucid and self-lacerating prose is a literary triumph.Read More


Némirovsky's Book Reveals Passion for Country That Betrayed Her

By Steven G. Kellman

Némirovsky's Book Reveals Passion for Country That Betrayed Her
The most powerful passion in Irene Nemirovsky’s novel is her love for France. The writer embraced the language and religion of a country that spurned and eventually killed her.Read More


A Man, a Dog and an Author

By Steven G. Kellman

A Man, a Dog and an Author
It is not obligatory for an Israeli novelist to double as national prophet, but it helps secure publication in the United States, where translations constitute less than 3% of books. Writing about and against public injustice, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Václav Havel and Reinaldo Arenas found American readers. Compatriots who pursued private themes did not.Read More


Nicole Krauss’s Desk and Its Clutter

By Steven G. Kellman

Nicole Krauss’s Desk and Its Clutter
It is a great desk — an enormous, ornate escritoire equipped with 19 drawers — rather than a “Great House” that connects the characters in Nicole Krauss’s ambitious third novel, following “Man Walks Into a Room” (2002) and “The History of Love” (2008). Like one of those anthology movies, such as “Tales of Manhattan” (1942), “The Yellow Rolls-Royce” (1964) or “The Red Violin” (1998), that binds its separate stories through ownership of a single item, whether a black tailcoat, an automobile or a violin, “Great House” uses a desk to link strangers scattered in New York, London, Jerusalem and Santiago, Chile.Read More






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