'Jew Pond' Earns Unwanted Scrutiny

New England Town Ponders Name With Curious History

What’s in a Name? Frank and Jill Weber have lived in Mont Vernon, N.H., for almost four decades. They want the official name of Jew Pond changed.
Ted Siefer
What’s in a Name? Frank and Jill Weber have lived in Mont Vernon, N.H., for almost four decades. They want the official name of Jew Pond changed.

By Ted Siefer

Published February 22, 2012, issue of March 02, 2012.

One could say it was bacteria that caused Jew Pond to emerge from the miasma of history.

In the summer of 2010, an algae bloom forced the closure of a small swampy pond near the center of Mont Vernon, a storybook New Hampshire town of 2,400 people. And so it was that “Jew Pond” was splashed across the headlines of the local papers.

The name wasn’t news to longtime residents; that’s what they had always called the pond. As best as anyone could remember, it was because a couple of Jews had briefly owned a nearby hotel back in the 1920s.

Newer residents, including a Jewish couple living in town, were aghast at what they considered a slur. A well-meaning town health officer petitioned authorities to change the name.

But the town’s Yankee establishment dug in its heels, insisting that the name is part of its heritage. Now the issue is on the agenda of a March 13 town meeting.

There’s probably no one in Mont Vernon with a more visceral reaction to the Jew Pond controversy than Jill and Frank Weber, one of the few Jewish families in the area.

Click to enlarge.
Kurt Hoffmand
Click to enlarge.

The Webers, who are originally from New York, have lived in the area for nearly 40 years since buying a ramshackle house for $12,000. (“We were ripped off,” Frank Weber exclaimed.) They say they love the community spirit even though they know they will always be considered outsiders.

“I feel so fortunate for having found my roots here,” said Frank Weber, a burly man whose father was killed by the Nazis.

Still, the Jew Pond name struck a nerve, and the Webers are determined to speak out against it at the upcoming meeting.

“I don’t care if they continue to call it Jew Pond. By all means, make yourself happy,” Frank Weber said. “I just want the damn name changed. It shouldn’t be on any maps.”

The Jewish Federation of New Hampshire and the state’s influential Roman Catholic bishop have also stepped into the fray, urging the town to reject the name.

“You just absolutely know it’s meant to convey some measure of contempt,” Bishop Peter Libasci wrote in an editorial in a local paper.

Roberta Wilkins, a member of the town historical society, acknowledged that the Jew Pond name was probably an “insult.” But like many of the town’s old-timers, she regards the name as innocuous and as an echo of the town’s heritage.



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