Reb Shlomo Meets Nigeria

Zion80 Mashes Up Carlebach Tunes With Fela Kuti Rhythms

Beasts of No Nation: Jon Madof leads the Zion80 ensemble based in Manhattan’s East Village. The group is combining two very different musical traditions: Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach and Nigerian superstar Fela Kuti.
Matthew Paneth
Beasts of No Nation: Jon Madof leads the Zion80 ensemble based in Manhattan’s East Village. The group is combining two very different musical traditions: Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach and Nigerian superstar Fela Kuti.

By Alexander Gelfand

Published August 09, 2012, issue of August 17, 2012.
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Fela Anikulapo Kuti and Shlomo Carlebach are not an obvious pairing.

The first was a Nigerian musician, political activist and devotee of traditional Yoruba religion who married 27 wives simultaneously, was jailed for his aggressive criticism of the Nigerian government and died of AIDS after a lifetime of inspired rabble-rousing. The second was an American Orthodox rabbi and musician who joined the Lubavitcher Hasidic sect, founded a countercultural Jewish commune in San Francisco in the 1960s and evolved into a cuddly icon of inclusive, participatory Judaism.

Nonetheless, as guitarist and composer Jon Madof recently proved at an open rehearsal of his latest ensemble, Zion80, held at The Stone, John Zorn’s experimental music venue in Manhattan’s East Village, the two deceased icons get along pretty well.

Zion80 takes melodies by Carlebach and clothes them in original arrangements inspired by the work of Kuti, inventor of the hugely influential style known as Afrobeat. (Zion80 is a riff on the name of Kuti’s last band, Egypt 80.) Madof explained the genesis of the idea in an email to the Forward:

I was getting ready to take my kids to shul one Shabbat last year, and I started singing a Carlebach tune to myself with an Afrobeat rhythm (probably because I had been listening to Fela a lot the day before). I thought about other familiar Carlebach tunes, and they all seemed to work. As soon as I figured out that nobody had done a similar project already, I went for it!

A group practice session by a 12-piece band that started on a whim might not sound like something you’d necessarily want to sit through, especially since Zion80 was scheduled to play a full-fledged performance later in the evening, as it will every Monday night through September. But this one was well worth it.

For one thing, the group is so good that the expected mishaps — missed cues, blown endings — hardly diminished the quality of what transpired. There was little to distinguish the rehearsal from the performance, except that the latter contained fewer interruptions and less spoken commentary.

For another, those comments shed light on the process by which Madof is constructing this unusual combination of neo-Hasidic melodies and Afro-pop arrangements: altering harmonies, expanding forms and making plenty of space for improvisation. And the interruptions gave listeners a chance to reflect on just how unusual that combination is, and how well it seems to work.

Kuti and Carlebach lived in different musical worlds. Kuti’s Afrobeat, a product of Ghanaian highlife, American funk and personal genius, was a densely textured, polyrhythmic confection in which horns, percussion, keyboards and guitars all played interlocking parts, just like the instruments in a West African drum ensemble or one of James Brown’s ’60s-era bands.

Carlebach was a singer-songwriter whose stock in trade was crafting hummable tunes inspired by Hasidic nigunim, those wordless, suitelike melodies that serve as vehicles for ecstatic communion with the Divine.

On the surface, this hardly seems like a recipe for great success. But as it turns out, anything sounds good recast as Afrobeat, especially when played by a band assembled from the Downtown and Jewish elite.


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