Orthodox Jews Find Pick in Santorum

Candidate's Family and Conservatives Values Strike a Chord

Family Man: Even if they don’t share his religion, Orthodox voters appreciate the fact that Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum wears his faith on his sleeve.
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Family Man: Even if they don’t share his religion, Orthodox voters appreciate the fact that Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum wears his faith on his sleeve.

By Josh Nathan-Kazis

Published March 26, 2012, issue of March 30, 2012.
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While presidential hopeful Mitt Romney is the pick of the Republican Jewish establishment, Rick Santorum enjoys notable support among Orthodox Jews — a phenomenon that could become more visible with the approach of primaries in states that have large Orthodox populations.

Romney, the front-runner in the Republican primary race, has raised millions from prominent Republican Jews. Though Santorum has fewer Jewish ties, he has Orthodox fans and is planning to appeal to them in New York and in his home state of Pennsylvania.

Orthodox commentators and lobbyists say that Santorum’s focus on social issues is popular in their community and that his values and his personal life resemble their own.

“There’s no doubt that Mr. Santorum’s religious background and conservative religious stances on things like abortion and same-sex marriage resonate well with much of the Orthodox community,” Avi Shafran, director of public affairs for the ultra-Orthodox advocacy group Agudath Israel of America, wrote in an email to the Forward. Santorum’s large family and his disabled daughter, Shafran continued, are “something that endears him as a person to many an Orthodox heart.”

Barbara Ledeen worked for Santorum when he was a senator, serving as a director of coalitions for the Senate Republican Conference. She currently is an unofficial adviser to the Santorum campaign. Ledeen said that the candidate plans to visit Orthodox communities in New York, Pennsylvania and elsewhere when the primaries arrive in those states in late spring.

It’s not clear whether Orthodox Jews could play a deciding role in a presidential race. Of the 6 million Jews in the United States, only 10% are thought to be Orthodox.

After trailing the rest of the Republican field for months, Santorum emerged in March as the most viable alternative to Romney. Santorum, a conservative Catholic, has been vocal about his faith and has built a reputation on his staunch opposition to same-sex marriage and abortion, among other issues.

Though Santorum sponsored Israel-related legislation as a senator that made him popular with Israel advocates, Romney has enjoyed the support of most prominent Jewish Republican donors. Those donors, many of them wealthy secular businessmen, are generally moderate on social issues. In a year when Republicans hope to win a greater proportion of the Jewish vote, Romney’s past as a pro-choice governor and his emphasis on the economy are thought to be a potential attraction for Jewish voters in the general election.

But Santorum’s appeal to the conservative Republican base may have hit home with the Orthodox.

“We haven’t done any polling on that, but what I can say is that Santorum should have very good appeal in the Orthodox community,” said Nathan Diament, director of the Institute for Public Affairs, the advocacy arm of the Orthodox Union. “He’s got a record of being responsive to Orthodox community concerns.”


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